🌟 Exclusive 2024 Prime Day Deals! 🌟

Unlock unbeatable offers today. Shop here: https://amzn.to/466CPuu 🎁

Things You Should Know About the Corrosion Issue on the Jeep WranglerJL and Gladiator JT

Bunch of Malarkey!

There is one difference - the hood. The 392 hood is steel, so you won’t get this galvanic corrosion there. Doors, sure, it’s possible still. But we paid an extra $20k for a reason 😉
 
Last edited:
Are those the Epic/Double Black flare extensions? Look a lot better than OEM, which I don’t even mind. But the Epic (if that’s these here in the video) just look much better and “complete.”
 
None with mine. SoCal resident though, so not in an area putting me at high risk for corrosion.
 
Anyone having an issue yet with their 21’s?

its galvanic corrosion, nothing to do with salt
Doesn't humidity increase the risk for galvanic corrosion? I live in a dry area of SoCal, which I assumed put me at lower risk.
 
Bunch of Malarkey!

There is one difference - the hood. The 392 hood is steel, so you won’t get this galvanic corrosion there. Doors, sure, it’s possible still. But we paid an extra $20k for a reason 😉
Although the hood is steel the hinge is aluminum. So I am guessing it is still possible. I am in SoCal and my 21 sits outside close to the beaches. It may not rain much but consistent marine layer, fog, dew and drizzle. So far no issues. Yet.
 
I commented in another thread that I am not so sure that the theory of galvanic corrosion is correct, for the JLs at least (the JK is a different matter, as they had steel doors and aluminum hinges).

There is another theory that I have heard floated that I think makes much more sense, and that is poultice corrosion.

The theory goes... Jeep's primer and paintwork processes are not adequately covering body panels, and in part due to the unprimed contact point between the hinge and the door panel and poor primer and paintwork around where the hinge and the door panel meet, the paint at the contact point is very thin and easily disrupted or compromised, allowing for a breach point in the paint to be easily created through which water can enter (if a breach point doesn't already exist from poor paintwork at the factory - I have seen some really terrible paint coverage around the hinges on brand new Jeeps sitting on dealer lots). Due to aluminum's nature, it forms an oxide coating when exposed to the elements, but paint arrests the formation of this oxide coating... until the paint is disturbed or compromised. Water gets in through this breach point and then it's all downhill from there.

I am going to copy and paste and explanation of this process from a boating website, because it's written better than I could write it, and I will supply the source link...

"The paint works well until it is breached, and water enters the rift. This breach could be caused by a fastener, an antenna base, a navigation light, a hinge, a lockset, a nick, or a scratch—and it could be microscopic. Initially the wound is self-healing: The oxide coating forms, but instead of protecting the aluminum, it lifts the edge of the paint and allows water to migrate farther under the coating. At that point, the chemical equation changes, as moisture and aluminum, in the absence of air, are the ideal incubators for a phenomenon known as poultice corrosion. When this happens, the aluminum pits and produces copious amounts of aluminum oxide powder or, when wet, aluminum hydroxide, which looks a bit like freezer-burned vanilla ice cream. The formation of the oxide or hydroxide lifts the paint, causing the familiar and unsightly blister, which eventually falls off, exposing raw, pitted aluminum. The process doesn’t stop there, as it begins anew at the interface between the paint and exposed aluminum. While it progresses slowly, once it begins it’s difficult if not impossible to arrest without removing the blistered paint, cleaning, priming, and repainting the surface.

I think this is much more likely to be the culprit, as if it were the bolts, then we would see the corrosion issue start at the bolt and work its way out, and we wouldn't see it starting on other parts of the hinge, doors, or hoods, yet I have seen Jeeps where the bubbling has started at the bottom edge of the door, or the edge of the hood. Granted, the overwhelming majority of paint bubbling issues I have seen are around the hinges, but they don't start at the hinge and work their way outward. They start on the door around the point where the hinge and the door meet, and the paint is thin.

 
Manufacturers are mandated by the good old Government to produce vehicles that meet regulations for fuel mileage known as CAFE Standards then there’s the safety standard along with emissions standards along with environmental issues such as paints and chemicals involved in building our beloved Jeep’s..
My point is there’s a lot of give and take as the manufacturers hands are tied..
I recall meeting the Rubicon design engineers in Moab back in 2003 at the Jeep Owners Rock Crawl sponsored by Daimler Chrysler for new Rubicon owners.. My big beef at the time was all the unpainted items under my shinny new TJ Rubicon, such as drive shafts, front knuckles and such.. The answer I recall getting is the outside vendors would have to meet EPA requirements to apply said paint.. in my opinion that why so many after market parts are powder coated and we all know in most cases how bad powder coating protection is next to nothing in a corrosive environment such as salt air along with salts applied to our roads in a winter environment.. Unless they are Ecoated prior to powder coating such as the process AEV protects their beautiful bumpers and such..
Sure it sucks our brand new expensive Jeep’s will and already do show corrosion.. Don’t believe me, crawl under your Jeep and look at the welds on the frame, gas tank skid plate.. each of these weld is already showing some sort signs of rust... take this into account all Jeep’s rust clear back to the time of Willys Overland to today’s FCA...
For me I’m in the position to keep mine away from the elements, our 2018 JKU has never seen winter roads just like our 392 never will either... keep in mind where I live we get an average of 150” of snow fall per year..
Both Jeep’s will be under covers with a battery tender providing life support to the batteries tucked away in the garage..
Old saying for International Scout”s There’s Scout”s that are rusty and there’s Scout’s that are going to rust...

Unfortuantely, all of those preventative measures during the winter don't mean much if the problem is that the paint is so thin in certain areas that water is getting through and under, resulting in poultice corrosion that causes blistering paint (which is the subject of this thread)... We both know Colorado has plenty of moisture in the other seasons... Check out the link I posted to the boating website...
 
Wait till the salts, Magnesium Chloride along with Apex hit your thin paint... we both know Colorado has plenty of corrosive moisture in every nook and cranny of every vehicle traveling the mountain corridor... we used to travel snow packed roads during the winter...

Yeah, I think you're missing the point... which is, we all know full well that the crap they put down on the road in the winter is corrosive... But, when the primer and paintwork is done so poorly that moisture *without* the presence of that crap is causing paint to blister (due to poultice corrosion), we have much bigger issues / concerns which point to something wrong beyond the presence of corrosive road treatments used in winter weather.

There are plenty of Jeeps that live in the Southeast that don't see winter conditions or road treatments like we have here in Colorado, or like they have up in the Rust Belt, and that don't live near bodies of salt water that have paint blistering on the doors, hoods, and around the hinges, simply from being exposed to "clean" moisture (rain, car washes)...
 
Yeah, I think you're missing the point... which is, we all know full well that the crap they put down on the road in the winter is corrosive... But, when the primer and paintwork is done so poorly that moisture *without* the presence of that crap is causing paint to blister (due to poultice corrosion), we have much bigger issues / concerns which point to something wrong beyond the presence of corrosive road treatments used in winter weather.

There are plenty of Jeeps that live in the Southeast that don't see winter conditions or road treatments like we have here in Colorado, or like they have up in the Rust Belt, and that don't live near bodies of salt water that have paint blistering on the doors, hoods, and around the hinges, simply from being exposed to "clean" moisture (rain, car washes)...
This is correct. Winter driving *MIGHT* speed up the process but it's not the cause. It's destined to happen to all JL's, even our $90K+ 392s.
 
This is correct. Winter driving *MIGHT* speed up the process but it's not the cause. It's destined to happen to all JL's, even our $90K+ 392s.
I’m hoping beyond hope that all the early warranty claims they had for this issue has led to better surface prep, primer and paintwork, and QC, but I’m not naive enough to think that is actually the case. It is Jeep, after all.
 
Back
Top