Jeep Markets Factory Wheels as Beadlock Capable - What does that even mean?

JeepnJam

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Hey just curious if any one has been successful at converting the 392 Wheels to beadlocks? I was looking at Mopar's website and trying to figure out if part P5160154 is what is needed.

Seems like it might be, but I am not sure our wheel has that many bolts around it. Has anyone taken off the trim ring on the Stock Wheels to inspect what is behind it; or do you know what Mopar part is needed?
 
I believe you are right, just need that part to use the bead lock feature.

I know some here have taken the trim ring off and I will do it just before taking my 392 to Discount Tire for some larger tires. After I get my 392.....

I too, had never heard of bead lock "capable" until my neighbor got a Raptor.
 
The ring that is on the wheels now is just a plastic rock rash protector, you don't need to take it off to change tires if you are not changing to a true beadlock ring. There are more bolt holes under the ring, remove the ring and mount the tire on the outside of the rim, then clamp if down with the beadlock ring and bolts and washers.
 
A few friends of mine had to remove the “beauty ring” before a tire shop would mount tires.
The rings on the wheels when you buy the vehicle, are only for looks. You can buy the kit for a few hundred $ to make them into bead locks. Some shops will mount tires, some won’t. Do some research With tire shops before you get surprised.
I just had one guy tell me they couldn’t mount tires on any wheel without the TPMS, and this was a federal law. When I went back to get them mounted, same shop, a different guy, told me he never heard of such law and mounted my tires on my new wheels and put them on the Jeep without question.

it’s worth inquiring.
 
The ring that is on the wheels now is just a plastic rock rash protector, you don't need to take it off to change tires if you are not changing to a true beadlock ring. There are more bolt holes under the ring, remove the ring and mount the tire on the outside of the rim, then clamp if down with the beadlock ring and bolts and washers.
Did not know that ring was plastic! I plan to take them off before getting tires installed so the monkeys dont f up the PLASTIC ring.
 
A couple of things on beadlocks: while the 392 and XR's come with beadloack-capable, it's not the same as beadlocked wheels per 'se. True beadlocks (no ability to seat the bead on inner rim) are not DOT approved and are for Off-road use only. The idea of beadlock capable is to bring the capability "part time" to the masses allowing users to have a street legal wheel (inner rim seated) with the option to temporarily switch to beadlocked when off-roading withthe adition of the beadlock ring. Plenty of people run them beadlocked every day - but a small warning: don't have a blowout that causes an accident as all 50 states have beadlocks as "off-road use only" and it's just a lawsuit waiting to happen.

As for removing the ring: depends (and I haven't seen the 392 first hand to know). Some can easily have a tire installed with the beadlock in place as the plastic "cosmetic" ring usually has a smaller diameter than the inner rings and the tire can pass over it without the use of a mounting machine (or for us older guys - a lot of sweat and swearing.)

The issue I've had was local shops not wanting to risk breaking a plastic ring putting the wheel on the mounting machine, but it would've still worked. They just don't want to be responsible for it cracking for any reason - as it's plastic after all...
 
No way you are putting the plastic ring in a tire machine and not breaking it.
 
Most of the bigger tire shops have the new style tire changers that don't touch the rim when installing tires, so no need to remove the ring. I guess it would be better to call first to see if their machine is capable or not.
 
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I had my tires installed on a set of Dirty Life 17X9's with the plastic ring in place, no issues, no damage. I watched it, the machine never touched the wheel. I later got the beadlock rings and switched over to beadlocks and rebalanced.
 
No way you are putting the plastic ring in a tire machine and not breaking it.
As @RKKRAWL and @CPT Papa said, not really an issue today - I agree that in shops of old (and us guys who used to do it manually) there's no way - but the roller and "tongue" of the new machines are on the outside of the rim. As long as the cosmetic ring is a smaller diameter than the rim edge, should never touch it.
 
Sure, its been a "few" years since I mounted a tire in my Dad's tire store but I still think I will be removing the rings now that I know they are plastic before I get new tires.
 
Oh heck yeah! You know how many times I've slipped a crowbar and would've torn through "plastic" versus steel?
I think I'm more in "wonderment" over why a factory tire store wouldn't mount just because it has a beauty ring? Either remove it, or use the machine (which "shouldn't" damage it...)
 
A couple of things on beadlocks: while the 392 and XR's come with beadloack-capable, it's not the same as beadlocked wheels per 'se. True beadlocks (no ability to seat the bead on inner rim) are not DOT approved and are for Off-road use only. The idea of beadlock capable is to bring the capability "part time" to the masses allowing users to have a street legal wheel (inner rim seated) with the option to temporarily switch to beadlocked when off-roading withthe adition of the beadlock ring. Plenty of people run them beadlocked every day - but a small warning: don't have a blowout that causes an accident as all 50 states have beadlocks as "off-road use only" and it's just a lawsuit waiting to happen.

As for removing the ring: depends (and I haven't seen the 392 first hand to know). Some can easily have a tire installed with the beadlock in place as the plastic "cosmetic" ring usually has a smaller diameter than the inner rings and the tire can pass over it without the use of a mounting machine (or for us older guys - a lot of sweat and swearing.)

The issue I've had was local shops not wanting to risk breaking a plastic ring putting the wheel on the mounting machine, but it would've still worked. They just don't want to be responsible for it cracking for any reason - as it's plastic after all...
The term not DOT approved is a misnomer...the DOT doesn't approve any wheels for on or off road use. Companies put that "not DOT approved" stuff on their website to cover themselves in the event of a misinstallation leading to a vehicle crash, etc.
 
DOT does federally regulate certain things such as motorcycle helmets, brake components, tires, seatbelts, and relevant to this conversation, rims. If DOT does not approve for street use, they can’t be legally sold for street use without a question of liability coming into play. Installers don’t want the liability. So, like the vehicle manufacturers, the don’t sell them for street registered vehicles. Can you buy them and install them? Yes. But the liability passes to you as the Department of Transportation essentially rated them “as not street legal” by withholding DOT approval.
 
DOT does federally regulate certain things such as motorcycle helmets, brake components, tires, seatbelts, and relevant to this conversation, rims. If DOT does not approve for street use, they can’t be legally sold for street use without a question of liability coming into play. Installers don’t want the liability. So, like the vehicle manufacturers, the don’t sell them for street registered vehicles. Can you buy them and install them? Yes. But the liability passes to you as the Department of Transportation essentially rated them “as not street legal” by withholding DOT approval.
No doubt that DOT regulates things, but they don’t approve or disapprove wheels. They set out the specifications for safety. Beadlock wheels are not explicitly illegal under Federal Law; however some State Laws may have additional laws around wheels. In Tennessee they do not have laws surrounding any type of wheels - we have lift laws but nothing about wheels.

Could an attorney argue that a beadlock wheel caused an accident…of course they could! You don’t have to live in fear that the police are going to pull over for having beadlocks, at least in my state.
 
FYI the fake beadlock ring on the stock 392 wheels is not plastic at all!!!!!

It’s metal, see curb rash sustained at Windrock for reference on my wheels.
 

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Sorry about the scars but great to hear about them being metal! If you had to do it all over again would you remove the rings for that Windrock trip?
 
Sorry about the scars but great to hear about them being metal! If you had to do it all over again would you remove the rings for that Windrock trip?
Absolutely not. Those rings help to protect the valve stem from damage - mud, sticks, rocks and other debris that could make for a bad day.

You know going into trails 16 and 51 at Windrock that you more than likely going to sustain some damage somewhere.

You can always take the ring off and hit with a rattle can, let it dry and it’s good as new lol.
 
Thanks @Jeepstin392 ! Good info. Like I said, it's all about the liability!

Bummer on the battle scar, @JeepnJam ! But glad you chimed in that the beauty rings aren't plastic (even though you have one that is slightly less purdy right now... 😂🤣 )
 
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